10 February 2019
Transcript - #2019025, 2019

Doorstop interview, Torrens University, Melbourne

Subjects: $300,000 in federal funding for the Impact21 Pilot program.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

It’s terrific to be here with my parliamentary colleagues Sarah Henderson and Senator Jane Hume for the launch of Impact21 and with some very special people.

Raynor, great to see you, and also your fellow workers who are going to be participating in this wonderful new program of supporting employment for people with Down syndrome.

It’s the brainchild of Cate Sayers and e.motion21, which again has done some ground-breaking work in ensuring that young people with Down syndrome can get access to dancing classes so that they can move bodies and move boundaries and move minds. And so, I think this initiative, which is a partnership between industry and the not-for- profit sector and disability support services is fantastic and assists young people like Raynor find full-time employment, which will now enable them to have the dignity, the independence that they deserve.

QUESTION:

What do you say to the companies who have jumped on board, who’ll be hiring these people, who’ve also invested in the program?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

It’s terrific to see so many blue-chip Australian companies participate in this program and it’s just the start. My message today is to the financial institutions of Australia, to the banks, the insurance companies, the superannuation funds. You too need to join this cause and participate in providing employment opportunities for young people with Down syndrome.

QUESTION:

Until now, how would you describe what the opportunities were like for young people?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Well, as Sarah Henderson has said, the opportunities have not been enough. We need to do more, and this is a really good start that the Government is supporting. But it will take a collective effort. Not just by Government but particularly by industry and the not-for-profit sector because it’s those organisations that are really doing the hard work behind the scenes to find good, rewarding, full-time employment opportunities for young people with Down syndrome.

QUESTION:

And it’s a pilot study here in Carlton – pardon, here in Melbourne. Would you like to see - how would you measure its success in terms of spreading it further across the country?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Well, I absolutely can see this rolling out nation-wide and I know that it will be a focus for Impact21 and for the drivers of this policy.

QUESTION:

You’ve got Raynor here with you. Does he sound like someone special to you?

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Well, I love Raynor except he’s coming after my job he tells me! Raynor, I ask you, what would be your favourite, perfect job?

RAYNOR:

Prime Minister!

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Prime Minister! Well, okay, you can leave me in my position. That’s good to hear. And what do you think of this initiative today and the work that you’ll be doing?

RAYNOR:

I can, I can work as a part of Victoria. We need more money from our Australian Government for the tax return and the superannuation, our financial year.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

You told me you were going to do your own tax return, didn’t you?

RAYNOR:

Yes, that’s what I’m doing.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

That’s great and your own superannuation!

RAYNOR:

Yes, because my mum and my dad is on (inaudible).

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Very good!

RAYNOR:

And what we can do is we can sell our place and move up to the beach house and we can go up there one day and I will get a job instead.

JOSH FRYDENBERG:

Fantastic! Well I hope you’re really enjoying this.

QUESTION:

Raynor, how do you feel about being one of the thirteen students as part of it? Are you looking forward to it?

RAYNOR:

Yes, I am.

QUESTION:

And why is that?

RAYNOR:

I am quite excited, so I am just so happy to see our new boss here!